The Great Fire of London

“It begun this morning in the King’s baker’s’ house in Pudding-lane.”

Samuel Pepys

I love this topic as it involves building projects, fun drawings, songs and more. There are so many resources on this subject that’s it’s difficult to know where to start…

Homework and Crafts

One of the most exciting things that happened at my kids old school was actually recreating the Great Fire of London. The homework challenge was to make a house make of cardboard and decorate it – but be ready to watch it burn a week later!

It seemed a shame to burn everything after all their hard work, but I think it really hit home what is was like to watch your home burn, and to see how quickly the fire spread.

Singing, Watching and Reading

We have a lot of singing in our house, but this topic allowed me to teach the kids ‘London’s Burning’. I used to sing this song lots when I was a Brownie, singing in a round. Now it’s not just the case of teaching them the song by listening to me sing to them, but it’s always backed up by a YouTube video!

To be fair to YouTube, there are lots of good resources. Even if you get a chance to watch a 10 minute educational video, it’s better than nothing. Especially when our lives are so busy!

I like this short video. It’s just got a nice charm about it as the Grandad tells the story of The Great Fire of London.

In regards to reading, I find this a simple way of getting the kids interested in a subject.. plus it allows me to swat up before they start asking questions. They’re certainly starting to take in more facts than I can remember!

Anyway… we bought the 3rd book on this list. It’s not one for a 6 year old to read easily particularly but it’s got some good facts and images.

The one thing I noticed that certain facts get really gets stuck in kids heads. Here is a summary from my 6 year old!

  1. The fire started in a bakery in Pudding Lane (when we recently had a trip to London, the first thing I was asked was… “…can we visit Pudding Lane Mum”
  2. Most of the houses were made of timber (wood) and were very close together
  3. It was very windy which made the fire spread fast
  4. It all took place in 1666

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